The Detention Poem

Poetry, songs and rap have many things in common.

This week English Teacher Online shares the Detention Rap – to inspire you to write your own poetry.

The Detention Poem (by Teacher Steve)

Hey cheeky children, are you looking for me?

I’m telling you now, you won’t take me for free,

I’m a teacher at your school and I do it with style,

So why don’t you all stick around for a while,

In detention, detention, talking ‘bout detention, detention,

…So you didn’t do your homework, good for you,

I’ll see you in detention for a lunchtime or two,

I’m a teacher in your school and I do in with style,

So why don’t you all stick around for a while,

In detention, detention, talking ‘bout detention, detention,

See y’all

Writing Your Own Poetry

Start by Brainstorming

This means writing down all the ideas you have about a topic. Think about what, where, when, who, how and why? Also, what feelings, smells, and sounds do you associate with your topic.  Brainstorming is all about giving yourself choices so you can move forward to the planning stage.

Example of Brainstorming

Who?               Teacher Trimble                Pronouns

How?                                                          Adverbs

What?             Taught us English              Verbs

When?             in Grade 4                          Joining Words

Why?                                                          Adjectives

Where?                                                       Nouns

Feelings, Sounds, Etc?

Rhyming Words – four, more, score, bore, law, sure, tour, saw,

Choose a Poetic Style

Look at your brainstorming ideas and choose a style to write your poem. Do you have enough rhyming words or do you need to choose a style of poem that doesn’t need rhyme?

There are many styles of poetry to study in Grade 5 such as Haiku, Diamante, Cinquain, Limerick, Acrostic, Free Verse, Shape or Rap.

Haiku

A poem with three non rhyming lines containing five, seven and five syllables.

Diamante

A seven-line diamond-shaped poem in the form below.

Cinquain

A five-line poem with lines in the following order;

A noun (2 syllables)

Adjectives (4 syllables)

Action verbs (6 syllables)

Phrase about the topic (8 syllables)

Synonym for the title (2 syllables)

Limerick

A humourous poem with five lines that has rhythm and rhyme.

Lines one, two and five share the same rhyme.

Lines three and four rhyme with each other.

Acrostic

A poem in which the first letter of each line form a word or message relating to the subject.

Free Verse

A poem that has few rules. It doesn’t need a set rhythm or rhyme.

Shape

A poem that is written in the shape of the thing it is describing. A great way to present any poem.

Count The Syllables to Find A Rhythm To Write Your Poem

Look at the poetry style you have chosen. The rhythm comes from the syllable count. Clap out the rhythm of your poem and try to get the right amount of syllables in each line.

Remember to stay relaxed, ask lots of questions, but most of all – be creative!

What ideas do you have for presenting your poems? Please leave a comment.

Author: Teacher Steve

Teacher Steve is 51 years old, happily married but has no children of his own. He's a fully qualified teacher who has been teaching English in sunny Thailand for over 15 years. Teacher Steve loves to write and decided to start English Teacher Online, in December 2016, to help students study English for free. He works tirelessly so that students can become fluent in English, empowering them to work and travel the world. You can also watch him teaching live at https://dlive.tv/Teacher_Steve?ref=teachersteve

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